HOME START HERE - THE BIO WHY THESE WORDS SCRIPT EXCERPTS MULTI-MEDIA TESTIMONIALS PLAYS, BOOKS, ETC. CONTACT ME

 
 
Back to Plays, Books, etc.

Imagine Working
by Marilyn Bagel

"Imagine Working," funded by the U.S. Department of Education, is a screenplay I wrote for Imagination Stage in Bethesda, Maryland that creatively coaches people with disabilities in how to find employment. It features an ensemble of actors who have previously performed together in other theatrical productions. In this opening of the first scene set in a diner, we meet one of the screenplay's principal characters ― BOJ, the Work Wizard. BOJ is "job" spelled backwards.

IMAGINE WORKING
Know Yourself


V/O (BOJ):
Wouldn't it be just great if you could order up a job as easily as you order a burger?

WAITRESS:
Hi Sweetie. What'll it be?

JOBSEEKER:
Uh M'am… I would really like to work in a theatre, and these ushering jobs look great. How about bringing me a number one, please.

WAITRESS:
That's a popular choice. 'Want anything else to go with that.

JOBSEEKER:
Yeah, can you make it part-time?

WAITRESS:
Sure, Hon, comin' right up.

DINER/BRUCE:
That was easy.

JOBSEEKER:
If only it were.

DINER/CASEY:
Have you looked at the classifieds?

JOBSEEKER:
I already tried.

DINER/CLAUDIA:
People with disabilities face huge challenges in trying to find work.

JOBSEEKER:
I don't know where to look anymore.

DINER/BRUCE:
Getting a job is a job in itself.

V/O (BOJ):
You said it.

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
Who said that?

BOJ/DAVID:
I'm Boj, the Work Wizard… King of the Quintessentially Qualified… Exalted Executive of the Employable… Advocate of the Accessible — the all wise, all-knowing Work Wizard. But, since that's way too much to put on my business card, you can just call me Boj. Now, the first step is for you to know more about yourself, and that does take a bit of wizardry.

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
Cool hat!

BOJ/DAVID:
Oh, this little number. It's just something I whipped up. So you want to get a job, huh?

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
I sure do. I have the brains and the energy. And I'd like to work with people. But where should I begin?

BOJ/DAVID:
Actually you already have everything you need to take the first step.

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
I do?!?

BOJ/DAVID:
Yes you do. You have yourself! Before you can decide what kinds of jobs you should apply for, you have to take a personal inventory of you.

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
How do I do THAT?

BOJ/DAVID:
You ask yourself a series of questions. We want you to think of them as your "work homework." For example, what kinds of things do you enjoy doing? What do you think you're good at doing?

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
I see. That means I have to interview myself before I let others interview me.

BOJ/DAVID:
That's exactly right. In fact, you'll really find it helpful to start keeping a Job Journal.

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
A Job Journal?

BOJ/DAVID:
That's right. It'll be a useful tool as you prepare to look for a job. To create yours, first you need a 3-ring loose-leaf binder. So… with a wave of my magic mouse… here goes.

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
Wait a minute… don't you mean a magic wand?

BOJ/DAVID:
That is so last century. Now everything's computerized. As I was saying… with a wave of my magic mouse.

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
Hey this is great.

BOJ/DAVID:
You'll also want to get a package of notebook dividers and some notebook paper. Here. Now label the first divider "Personal Inventory".

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
Okay. But what IS a Personal Inventory.

BOJ/DAVID:
It's a series of questions you ask yourself about yourself. Your answers and thoughts help you decide what kinds of jobs you may like — or not like. Ask a family member or friend.

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
I'll do that.

BOJ/DAVID:
Great! Now I want you to meet four of my most valued Work Wizard Associates. Shall we begin?

JOBSEEKER/J.P.:
Yeah! Bring 'em on.

© 2007 Imagination Stage, Inc.


Back to Plays, Books, etc.

 
Copyright © 2009 - • Marilyn Bagel • All Rights Reserved • Email WebmasterA SkyeLine Website